Ways to Invest in Real Estate: Buying vs Not Buying Property

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Investments are inherently risky - real estate in particular. The subprime mortgage crisis was barely a decade ago and it played a large role in a devastating recession.

Is real estate a good investment today? As with any potential investment, doing thorough research and examining all your options is crucial. One of the causes of the subprime mortgage crisis was predatory loan companies taking advantage of vulnerable homebuyers. 

Understand the risks and avoid working with lenders and companies that use questionable practices. Investing in real estate isn't for everyone. If you're willing to dip your toes in the water, your first step is to weigh whether you want to invest by buying property, or without buying property.

7 Ways to Invest in Real Estate by Buying Property

For many of the methods of investing in real estate, you'll need to have money saved. That's especially true if you are going to buy actual property.

If you have that money ready, buying property is the most direct and hands-on way to invest in real estate. But  purchasing a house involves quite a bit more than simply holding onto it.

Here are seven ways to invest in real estate that involve a purchase of actual property.

1. Buy and Fix Up a Home

Flipping a house like you're on HGTV is as hands-on as you can get for an investment. You buy the property, you put funds into fixing it up, and sell it for a profit.

Ideally, anyway. Fixing a home requires funds beyond the initial investment, and more time than you might have. It's a process, and one that requires a solid knowledge of real estate and home improvement. Even  profitable flips can seem like money losers for a long time. Patience is crucial if you're going to commit to a fixer-upper.

2. Rent-to-Own a Home

Rent-to-own is a tactic where you sign a contract to rent a home for a predetermined period of time with the option to purchase the home once that time expires. Often, that option is a requirement, a promise that you will be buying the home.

A percentage of your monthly rent payments go toward the down payment on a mortgage when the purchase becomes official.

Rent-to-own agreements come with risks, but they're good for people who cannot currently commit to buying a home. This gives people with other loans (credit card debt, hospital bills, etc.) time to pay those off without the added financial burden of a monthly mortgage. Comb through the rent-to-own contract carefully to make sure the details are in your favor, and it has the potential to help you ease your way into an investment.

3. Buy Rental Property

This can mean a few different things. In theory, if you have the money you could purchase an entire rental property and rent out any room or apartment to tenants. Keep your expenses low so you can keep rent affordable to entice prospective tenants.

You also could purchase property that you live in, while renting out other rooms in the property. Either way, you're the landlord. Be a good one, and you'll be in a much better position to succeed on this investment. Keep the property in great condition, be readily available to your tenants when needed, and if necessary hire someone who can help with repairs.

4. Purchase Vacation Property

Vacation property means renting out to tenants for shorter periods. Maintain a good house in the right area, and you may be able to make the same money off a few vacation tenants that you might make from a year-round tenant elsewhere.

Vacation rentals, because they are so often in a desirable area, can be expensive both to buy and maintain. Who wants to rent out a pigsty for their vacation? Weigh the pros and cons carefully. If you do it right - research carefully and consult with good Realtors - a beach rental can be lucrative come summer.

5. Use Lodging Apps Like Airbnb

Airbnb has become a popular way for some property owners to supplement their income. Why not incorporate it into your own investment?

How Airbnb works: Register your house on the app, specify the type of lodging you're offering (you can offer a room or the entire property), how many people it can accommodate and its availability. You also get to approve the guests staying at your property.

Airbnb can be a good choice in certain areas. Desirable vacation destination? Close to a music festival? Nice apartment in a popular city? You may be able to make a decent profit using Airbnb. If it's a property you own but don't reside in, the added availability can help out a lot. 

6. Purchase Commercial, Non-Residential Property

Commercial property - retail buildings or office buildings -  is an intriguing option for those who want to invest in real estate beyond just residential property. It's costlier, and you may want to look for partners in this investment.

As owner or part-owner of the property you can rent it out to businesses in need of space. It is high-risk, high-reward real-estate investing. Income made from renting space to businesses is generally higher than that from residents, and often the contracts to lease commercial buildings are longer than residential ones.

7. Buy Your House... That's It

Yes, if you bought a house and now live in it, congrats. You're a real-estate investor!

Rather than buying a house specifically to flip it, buying and holding can sometimes be incidental to why you actually bought the house: to live there. But consistently paying your mortgage and doing general upkeep for the house to make improvements can up the value of your home should you one day look for a new place to live. Treat your house like a long-term investment, and it could pay off down the line.

10 Ways to Invest in Real Estate Without Buying Property

If buying property is too expensive of an investment for you, it's not only way you can add real estate to your investment portfolio. There are plenty of ways to have a stake in the real-estate game.

Here are 10 ways you can invest in real estate without actually having to buy any property.

1. Invest in Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)

A REIT, or real estate investment trust, is a company that either owns or finances real estate that produces income. REITs invest the majority of their money into real estate, and it's how they make the majority of their income.

There are REITs that focus on both residential and commercial property. Most REITs are equity REITs, but some trade in mortgages instead of actual properties. Perhaps most important for you, the investor, is that at least 90% of the taxable income it pays is via dividends to the shareholders. So researching thriving REITs and purchasing shares in them has potential as a profitable investment.

2. Invest in Real Estate Mutual Funds

Real estate mutual funds differ somewhat from REITs. Whereas a REIT is an actual company, mutual funds are simply investments pooled together and overseen by an investment manager.

A mutual fund allows investors to have diversified their portfolio both in terms of having a mutual fund and having real estate. Like with other sorts of mutual funds, you can choose ones that are growth-oriented or income-oriented. As a diversified asset, they are designed with the intention of mitigating risk, but they are still vulnerable to the risks inherent in real estate. If a real estate-related risk negatively affects one of the investments in the fund, it's likely to impact a lot of others too.

3. Invest in Real Estate ETFs

In addition to REITs, there are REIT ETFs, or exchange-traded funds. REITs invest in real estate; REIT ETFs invest in REITs.

For example, the Vanguard Real Estate ETF (VNQ) includes some of the most notable REITs within its fund, like Simon Property Group (SPG) and Prologis (PLD) . It could be less risky than investing directly in a REIT, and certainly less risky than actually buying property, but you'll also be getting less of a return back. Still, if risk is one of your biggest concerns when mulling a real estate investment, a REIT ETF is something that should be considered.

4. Wholesaling Houses

Wholesaling real estate is a little similar to flipping homes, but you don't own the home and you don't have to front any maintenance cost.

Wholesaling a house means contracting someone who is looking to sell their house, and quickly taking that contract and selling it to a prospective buyer for a profit, which the wholesaler keeps. No fixing up involved.

If you can actually successfully do this, great! There's much less risk as you're not putting your own money into the operation. The difficult part of doing this is actually finding a house that has been undervalued on the market that you can manage to sell for a profit.

5. Use an Online Real Estate Investment Platform

Much like with other sorts of stocks, there are online platforms that help you make real estate investments as well. Often, these investments you make are part of crowd funding, a way for others to be able to buy property without requiring venture capital. Popular online real estate investment platforms include Fundrise and RealtyShares.

This option tends to be more for those with money to spare, considering the costs necessary to purchase large property.

6. Real Estate Partnerships

Some real estate investments require an exorbitant amount of money. Not everyone can foot that. If you're not the only one involved in the investment, however, it could become more manageable.

Partnerships are a common way to invest in real estate, with each person taking over different responsibilities. Often, this can be used as a way to purchase property at a lower price. You can set the terms - such as simply paying the mortgage, or perhaps handling the down payment for the property. Depending on the terms of your partnership, you may be investing in real estate without doing too much hands-on work of owning property.

7. Invest in Real Estate Service Companies

There are plenty of companies that work primarily in the world of real estate that you can invest in.

Look beyond REITs for your real estate companies. For example, RE/MAX is a company that sells homes via real estate agents. Companies involved in real estate that don't involve actually buying property can be a way to not only diversify your portfolio, but get a good sense of the current real estate market.

8. Invest in Home Construction Companies

Another real estate-related investment that could be worth your time are companies that are involved in the construction of homes.

There are plenty of home building companies whose stock trades on the NYSE every day, such as Lennar (LEN) and D.R. Horton (DHI) . It's an intriguing investment option for those who believe that the construction of homes is something that will continue to increase, because if that's true, business should continue to boom.

9. Become a Real Estate Appraiser

Have you considered employment within the real estate industry? It can not only be an investment of sorts, but prepare you for how the market is doing and when the time is right to make good investments.

One job within the industry to consider is a real estate appraiser. An appraiser can specialize in either residential or commercial real estate, and determine the value of a property. They take specifics about both the property and its nearby surroundings into account to do this. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median salary for a real estate appraiser or assessor in May of 2017 was $54,010. Those with the highest salaries, however, could make over $101,000 a year.

10. Start a Brokerage or Become a Real Estate Agent

You could also get into the game of selling real estate. Real estate agents require some education and training before they can actually get out there and flip houses, but successful real estate agents can take home nice commissions on the properties they sell.

Agents generally work for real estate brokers, and if you'd rather be at the top than out there selling the homes, perhaps consider opening a brokerage and hiring agents. Brokerages get a large part of the commission that the agents make, so having successful agents can bring in a lot of money.

But starting a brokerage isn't simple, and it's incredibly expensive. You need extensive training and licenses to open and maintain one. If you're a successful agent looking for the next step in their real estate career, it could be a great idea. But if you don't have that level of success, knowledge or funding, you may want to start with becoming an agent.

5 Creative Ways to Use a Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC)

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A home is the largest asset for most Americans. Not only is it where you live and make memories, tapping into a home’s equity — the difference between what you could sell your house for and the amount you owe on the house — may provide the funds to cover large expenses with reasonable terms.

Here, we explore five less common uses for home equity lines of credit, or HELOC, as well as some things to look out for.

Home equity loan vs. home equity line of credit

Before discussing ways to use your home equity, let’s compare home equity loans with home equity lines of credit.

Both are loans secured with the equity in your home. A home-equity loan is disbursed all at once in a lump sum at a fixed interest rate for a fixed amount of time, usually 10 years or longer.

By contrast, a home equity line of credit is more like a credit card. While you can draw the entire line of credit all at once, you typically make partial intermittent draws. The interest rate is variable, and you are only charged interest on the amount of the credit line that is outstanding. You have the ability to pay the line of credit down and then use it again without reapplying, just as you do with a credit card.

HELOCs are a good choice for short-term projects and those requiring intermittent influxes of cash. Home equity loans and HELOCs should be used with caution since defaulting could cause you to lose your home.

1. Down payment on a second home

If you plan to purchase a new home but need the proceeds from the sale of your current home to make a down payment on the new home, then a HELOC may be a good alternative.

Taking out the HELOC on your current home would allow you to remain in your home until it sells. Be sure to secure the HELOC on your current home before placing it on the market, since lenders will not allow you to place the HELOC on your home after it is listed.

This alternative is especially attractive in a buyer’s market when selling times are protracted.

2. In lieu of a construction loan

If you’re planning to build a new home while continuing to live in your current home, a HELOC can be an attractive alternative to a construction loan.

Construction loans typically demand higher interest rates than home equity loans and are more difficult to qualify for. In addition, a HELOC offers you the advantage of only borrowing what you need as construction proceeds.

Note that if you take out a construction loan instead, the lender will require routine inspections to ensure construction is proceeding as planned.

3. Fund long-term care for an elderly family member

The average cost for long-term care in the U.S. in 2016 was $225 a day for a semiprivate room in a nursing home. If your loved one requires long-term care but neither of you has the funds set aside to pay for it, consider a HELOC.

Using a line of credit gives you the flexibility to draw only what you need and is well-suited to pay for long-term care costs since you don’t know how long you will need the funds or how much you will need.

4. Fund a business startup

Coming up with the funds to start a business can be challenging. Using a HELOC allows you to draw only what you need at a favorable interest rate.

It is also easier to qualify for a HELOC than for other business loan startup options, such as a Small Business Administration loan.

Should you choose to use a HELOC to start your business, secure it while you still have income from another source. You may even want to line up a HELOC as backup when you first launch your business, even if you don’t currently need the funds.

5. Pay for education

If you don’t have sufficient funds set aside to pay for a loved one’s college education, consider using a HELOC to fund this expense as well.

As in the previous examples, using a HELOC allows you to draw only what you need, and HELOC rates are often more favorable than the rates for a Parent PLUS loan. According to Sallie Mae, Parent PLUS loan rates range between 5.62 percent and 12.87 percent. According to Bankrate, the national average HELOC rate on Sept. 26 was 5.47 percent.

Keep in mind that federal student loans can be deferred and also offer other protections that are not available to HELOC borrowers.

HELOCs and the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017

If you’re interested in accessing your home equity for any of these uses, note that HELOCs lost some of their tax benefits starting in the 2018 tax year.

Specifically, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 suspended the deduction of interest paid on home equity loans and lines of credit from 2018 through 2026, unless the loan is used to “buy, build or substantially improve the taxpayer’s home that secures the loan.”

The new tax law also reduced the deductibility of home mortgage interest from $1 million for married filing jointly taxpayers to $750,000.

All this means that if you utilize a HELOC for any of the purposes mentioned above, you will not be allowed to take a tax deduction for the interest you pay on the line of credit.

That said, HELOCs remain useful for those with substantial home equity who need funds either for a limited period of time or at an interest rate that falls below other sources available to them.

(Source: https://wtop.com/business-finance/2018/10/5-uncommon-ways-to-use-a-home-equity-line-of-credit/)

Best Bang for your Buck Remodeling Projects in Colorado

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It’s a good time to own Home Depot stock. Or a hardware store. Or a contracting business.

America is in the middle of a home renovation bonanza, according to research from Golden-based HomeAdvisor.

The average homeowner invested $6,649 in home improvements between March 2017 and March 2018, according to HomeAdvisor’s True Cost survey. That’s up $1,492 over 2017, itself a year in which HomeAdvisor’s annual survey tracked an $1,850 jump in consumer spending on home improvements.

The craze is multi-generational. Millennials completed more projects than any other age group, even if they spent 32 percent less on average compared to their baby boomer counterparts. Roughly eight out of every 10 millennial homeowners surveyed said they plan to spend more money on home improvements in 2018-2019 than they did in 2017-2018.

Driving the movement to stay put and fix up rather than move out are some issues Colorado home seekers know all too well at this point: A lack of homes for sale (though a recent survey shows inventory growing in the Denver metro area) and correspondingly high costs of available homes, observers say.

“Mobility rates are ticking down and I think there are a variety of factors to that,” HomeAdvisor home expert Dan DiClerico said. “With the combination of home prices and interest rates ticking up, it just doesn’t make sense for people to move at this particular moment.”

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It’s a good time to own Home Depot stock. Or a hardware store. Or a contracting business.

America is in the middle of a home renovation bonanza, according to research from Golden-based HomeAdvisor.

The average homeowner invested $6,649 in home improvements between March 2017 and March 2018, according to HomeAdvisor’s True Cost survey. That’s up $1,492 over 2017, itself a year in which HomeAdvisor’s annual survey tracked an $1,850 jump in consumer spending on home improvements.

The craze is multi-generational. Millennials completed more projects than any other age group, even if they spent 32 percent less on average compared to their baby boomer counterparts. Roughly eight out of every 10 millennial homeowners surveyed said they plan to spend more money on home improvements in 2018-2019 than they did in 2017-2018.

Driving the movement to stay put and fix up rather than move out are some issues Colorado home seekers know all too well at this point: A lack of homes for sale (though a recent survey shows inventory growing in the Denver metro area) and correspondingly high costs of available homes, observers say.

“Mobility rates are ticking down and I think there are a variety of factors to that,” HomeAdvisor home expert Dan DiClerico said. “With the combination of home prices and interest rates ticking up, it just doesn’t make sense for people to move at this particular moment.”

 

Of the more than 1,000 homeowners who talked to HomeAdvisor this spring, 84 percent had no plans to move in the next 12 months. That comes despite half of all millennials saying that want to move to bigger or nicer homes.

“Now it’s millennials just as much as older Americans that are having to stay put,” DiClerico said. “That’s a function of inventory in many parts of the country; not being able to trade up because the homes just aren’t out there.”

With dozens of possible projects in every home, DiClerico has some recommendation on how homeowners can best invest their hard-earned dough to bump up their home’s value should the time to sell come.

The best place to start is the kitchen. Although the 2017-2018 survey found the average kitchen remodel cost $22,145, even a much cheaper update could significantly boost a home’s value. New appliances, counter tops and flooring can be had for a combined $4,000, DiClerico said, and raise a home’s value by thousands of dollars.

“A smart, cosmetic kitchen renovation makeover like that could raise a home’s value 5 percent,” he said.

For a $367,000 home, the median value in Colorado according to Zillow, that could mean an extra $18,000 and change.

Once the new fridge is humming and new kitchen counter tops have been buffed to a glossy shine, the next best way to boost a home’s value is by turning unfinished space into livable space. While he puts the average cost of finishing a basement at around $7,500, again DiClerico says a more thrifty remodeling project can have a significant impact on value. Start with upgrading the lighting if the basement is in decent shape already, DiClerico said.

“Depending on the current condition of the space, if it doesn’t need to be fully redone, you could be in and out for a couple of thousand dollars,” DiClerico said.

When it comes to what sells a house, if it’s not the kitchen, it’s the bathrooms. It’s another area where the average renovation can be pricey — $9,742, according to the True Cost report — but a budget project can have an impact. Investing $2,500 in re-lining a shower or tub, updating the faucet and sink and installing new tile could provide a 2- to 3-percent boost in total home value, DiClerico said.

When it comes to doing something on the cheap or going whole hog, there is a judgement call to be made. DiClerico noted that a high-dollar kitchen renovation largely becomes sunk cost. Homeowners who invest $25,000 in their kitchens will not get all that money back at sale time, but if they’re in a home they love and plan to stay in long term, the focus shifts to the enjoyment they get out of the finished product.

At a time when home supply is lagging thousands of units short of demand in metro Denver, the home improvement industry isn’t just staying busy, it’s going bigger.

“One big trend we are seeing is the whole-house remodel,” said Patrick Condon, founder and president of the Finished Basement Company. “The family is moving out of the house, and we’re getting in and out of it and really giving them the home of their dreams.”

The Finished Basement Company handled design and project management services for more than 100 complex renovation projects in the Denver area last year, Condon said. For many people it comes down to loving the area where they live. He put the average cost of a whole-home overhaul between $150,000 to $250,000. Moving into a new home can cost upwards of $50,000 on its own, he added.

“You can change your house but you can’t change your neighborhood,” he said. “There are financial factors that come into it, but you can absolutely make any home your dream home.”

In Jefferson County, homeowner Kim McGrigg is now enjoying the home she bought last summer but could not live in it for the first six months she owned it. McGrigg and her husband bought a home in Genesee for $665,000 knowing it wasn’t exactly what they were after. They worked with the Finished Basement Company and invested $300,0000 in the property, living in an apartment in the meantime. The work included taking the kitchen down to the studs, splitting one large bathroom into two and lots of cosmetic updates.

“This was an opportunity for us to say, ‘We’re going to make this our house because we plan to live here for a long time,’ ” McGrigg said.

She has some advice for homeowners considering a project of this scale: Be patient.

“It’s hard to wait,” she said. “I was so excited about it, and it ended up being totally worth it.”

Source: https://www.denverpost.com/2018/09/08/colorado-money-saving-home-improvement-projects/#

Chill taking hold in metro Denver’s housing market

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The number of homes on the market surged, the number of sales dropped, and price reductions were abundant last month, all signs that buyers are pulling back in metro Denver, according to the latest market trends report from the Denver Metro Association of Realtors.

The inventory of single-family homes and condos available for sale at the end of August rose to 8,228, an increase of 7.65 percent from July and 11.8 percent higher than August 2017. Normally, the inventory barely drops between the two months and the change set a record.

“Over the past four years, we’ve experienced the strongest sellers’ market in recorded history,” Steve Danyliw, chairman of the DMAR Market Trends Committee and  local Realtor, said in the report. “This past month, we saw available homes for sale increase to the highest level in four years, giving buyers more homes to choose from.”

Single-family home sales in August dropped 7.46 percent from July, and are down 9.75 percent from the same month a year ago. Condo sales dropped 5 percent for the month and are down 15.6 percent from August 2017.

About 30 percent of sellers lowered their listing price in August to entice buyers, Danyliw said. That has created downward pressure in the market.

The median price of a single-family home sold in August was $445,000, down 1.1 percent from July and up 8.54 percent from a year ago. The median condo price was $299,000, up 0.89 percent from July and 9.05 percent from August 2017.

The number of days it took to sell a condo rose to 20 in August, up from 18 in July, while the number of days a single-family home took to sell rose to 23 from 21. While higher, both still reflect a fast pace of sales.

Danyliw pointed to several signs that buyers are pushing back more — fewer multiple offers on properties, fewer inspection allowances and fewer appraisal guarantees. That said, homes that are priced correctly and move-in ready still sell quickly.

Source: Denver Post (https://www.denverpost.com/2018/09/06/metro-denvers-housing-market-cooling-off/)